What is the Effect of Tea on your Teeth?

Tea Effect on Teeth

Not all drinks are good for our teeth. Besides sugar it is the PH value of some drinks that has negative effects on your teeth. People who have abandoned their morning cup of coffee for a healthier cup of herbal might want to think again, say British researchers. They found that many herbal seriously damage teeth by eroding protective enamel.

Effect on Teeth

Tea Effect on Teeth – Not all drinks are good for our teeth. Besides sugar it is the PH value of some drinks that has negative effects on your teeth. All warm Pickwick, also the fruit flavoured, are pH-neutral and do not effect the dental enamel. Therefore, tea is not only a delicious drink, but also a drink that can be drunk all day long. One cup of tea contains approximately 0.25 milligrams of fluoride. 

Fluoride is well known about its positive effect on teeth. One’s daily fluoride need is somewhere between 1.4 and 1.5 milligrams. Thus tea consumption also contributes to meet our fluoride need. People who have abandoned their morning cup of coffee for a healthier cup of herbal might want to think again, say British researchers. 

They found that many herbal  seriously damage teeth by eroding protective enamel. “Many of the herbal tested were found to be more erosive than orange juice,” University of Bristol researchers report in the Journal of Dentistry. Some were three times as acidic as juice. A spokesman for Twinings teas says saliva dilutes and neutralizes any acid in herbal, adds The Week magazine. 

What’s your poison, coffee or tea? Most adults prefer one or the other. After all, caffeine is a super pick-me-up. Hot or cold, black or doctored, our favorite daytime drinks are laced with it.

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However, our best beverages can wreak havoc on our beautiful smiles. Like tobacco, coffee beans, leaves and even colas can stain teeth brown. The more you sip, the more they stain. Some people stop taking it after their dentist asked them if they smoked because of teeth stains.  Well yes, it does stain. It contains tannic acid. You’ll have an idea when you see the thin film on the cold surface. Coffee, red wine and fruits such as apples and blueberries also contain this chemical and can stain teeth.

Tea is not only a delicious drink. Drinking it is good for your teeth!

“Drinking tea may ward off tooth decay.”
A study suggests chemicals in tea can destroy bacteria and viruses that cause throat infections, 

dental caries and other dental conditions. It raises the prospect of adding the extracts to toothpaste and mouthwash to protect the teeth. 
It found that caffeinated green tea was the best at fighting viruses, followed by caffeinated black tea.
 Decaffeinated blends were less effective as anti-viral agents.

The drinkers beverage of choice contains fluoride, a mineral that strengthens tooth enamel and guards against decay. Studies also show that it may reduce dental plaque and bacteria in the mouth, thereby helping to prevent cavities and gum disease. Green tea contains a bit more fluoride than black, but a few cups a day of either may help to save you from the dentist’s drill. 

“It’s important to choose a healthy diet, and that includes beverages,” says Blumberg, noting that Americans tend to opt for drinks with no nutritional value. “If it’s a choice between soda pop or [freshly brewed] iced – and you’re looking for the healthful choice – it’s a no-brainer.”

Apparently drinking it (without sugar, naturally) has a number of beneficial effects in preventing tooth decay. Many of the natural properties of tea, especially fluoride, which has been absorbed from the soil by the tea plant, contribute towards oral hygiene and a reduction in dental erosion.

And if you’re not a dentist, then that simply means, it helps prevent stinky breath and those who are dentists from shoving whirling drills into your mouth while grinning manically.

Another tea study found that polyphenols–chemicals found in tea–can help prevent bad breath. Laboratory experiments revealed that polyphenols can retard the bacterial growth that causes bad breath.

Although most teeth whitening procedures work fairly well, if you have sensitive teeth, then you may want to consider having it done professionally rather than using over the counter products. Teeth whitening should be considered as an essential part of dental hygiene as the first step towards maintaining your teeth’s health and preventing further tooth cavities and staining. 

You should go to a dentist for professional treatments because it is important that the chemicals used do not damage healthy enamel on your teeth. Do not drink any type of soda, as this can lead to staining as well. If you have a lot of coffee or tea each day, then you should limit their consumption to ensure that the stains do not linger. Once you follow a good oral hygiene routine at home, you will notice that your teeth become whiter and brighter.

Tea Effect on Teeth- Don't Miss out the Reliable Effect 2021